Penn and Tylers Green Conservation Area Appraisal

Penn and Tylers Green is a large and varied conservation area in a semi-rural setting on the outer limits of the suburban expansion of High Wycombe. It is an unusual conservation area due in part to the important role that the commons and open spaces within it play in the overall character, and the very different historical development of its component parts, which can be clearly read from the present day layout. It also crosses District Council boundaries: Penn lies within Chiltern district, Tylers Green in Wycombe district.

Penn is the more rural settlement, lying partly within the Green Belt and the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, with its ridge top development enjoying far-reaching countryside views. It has always been popular among the more prosperous parishioners and as a result has some fine large historic houses. There is a cluster of older buildings close to the 12th century church.

Tylers Green developed as a hamlet of Penn around the medieval tile industry, with early buildings situated on the edges of the common land. This, together with the expansion of the High Wycombe chair industry in the 19th century, has resulted in a layout reflecting large-scale encroachments on to the Common, with pockets of small vernacular dwellings clustered around tracks and pits, facing onto the open expanses of common. The commons, both grassed and wooded, still remain as key open spaces, which create a rural centre for the village. Away from these green centres, later suburban development has linked the settlement to the suburbs of High Wycombe via Hazlemere.

Much of the rural charm of the conservation area has been retained despite its proximity to High Wycombe, and the open spaces that remain are all the more precious and are under a great deal of development pressure.